All posts tagged: Social Justice

Top Ten for the Weekend (06/24/2016)

Top Ten for the Weekend is a collection of some of the most interesting bookish things I’ve seen lately.   1 and 2) In case you missed it, I posted TWO reviews this week, each of the Science Fiction genre. If you haven’t done so yet, check out my review on Kings of Earth (2015) by Joe Ponder and Parable of the Sower (1993) by Octavia Butler. Ponder is a newly publish author living in Texas. His book deserves some praise! Butler is well-known as not only a great writer but an icon in the genre. 3) After reading Remembering Octavia Butler, I wanted to honor her myself. I hope I did with my book review. 4) I also found out that talks started last year to turn Butler’s book, Dawn, into a tv series. This article from IndieWire gives you some more background. 5) If you need a pick-me-up, Blavity.com has a list for you. 11 Self-Help Books Written By Black People That Will Get You Through Anything. Making the cut is one of my current reads Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes. 6) And reminder of why …

Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy (Book Review)

Congratulations on making it past the title of this post and into the review. That’s the first step, but I warn you, not the last time you will have to encounter the n-word. Nigger. There. I said it. But do you say it? Is it a part of your vocabulary? Do you embrace it as a phrase of respect for others, or disown it, a heavy word of the past? Or do you whisper it when you hear it in songs or read it in texts, speaking just loud enough for you to hear in your own head? Is it a verb or a noun? An adjective? (Take a moment and sit with these questions.) In 2002, I received a book as a Christmas gift from some friends at school. That book was Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy. I can only imagine the horror my parents must have felt. What kind of friends did I have that would buy this? (They knew exactly what kind of friends- white friends.) At 17, I didn’t have the understanding …

Visiting the Vintage Paperback Collector’s Show and Sale (Event Review)

A couple of friends have been cheering me on as I get Black and Bookish off the ground, so when they heard about the 37th Annual Vintage Paperback Collector’s Show and Sale (what a mouthful!), they were eager to bring me along. All they knew is that there would be people selling old books, so that’s all I knew. 37th annual? How had I never heard of this? There was a moderate-sized crowd; people moved slowly from table to table to investigate the textures and titles. I wandered the floor for a bit, not really knowing what to look for. I didn’t have a plan going in- something I will try to avoid for future events. Most of the time, I followed around my friends like a little puppy. They were looking for very specific book editions and appeared much more put-together than I felt. I probably wasn’t noticed at all, but I felt like everyone knew I was an imposter. What did I know of vintage paperbacks? Nothing. I would pick up a book here or touch a shelf …

We Should All Be Feminist by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Book Review: Back2Back Feminism)

*My book obsessed tendencies lead to duplicate themes in my personally library. I must have been on a women’s power kick one day at the bookstore, because I purchased two books on feminism that day. In Back2Back posts, I’ll review each book separately.*  Feminism: the advocacy of women’s rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men; I don’t ever recall hearing my mother call me a feminist. She has used many words to describe me- activist, stubborn, and bookish, of course- but feminist, or feminism, are not common place terms for her. Why would they be? Feminism is a heavy word, weighted down by generalizations, misconceptions, and messy, group in-fighting. She would fully deny it if asked were she a Feminist, and I would probably agree. I, on the other hand, am a proud Feminist. It was the thing upon which I placed all my moral decisions (like how I went vegan for a while in my late 20s because I read a book linking female oppression to animal oppression). In college …