All posts tagged: Pop Culture

Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy (Book Review)

Congratulations on making it past the title of this post and into the review. That’s the first step, but I warn you, not the last time you will have to encounter the n-word. Nigger. There. I said it. But do you say it? Is it a part of your vocabulary? Do you embrace it as a phrase of respect for others, or disown it, a heavy word of the past? Or do you whisper it when you hear it in songs or read it in texts, speaking just loud enough for you to hear in your own head? Is it a verb or a noun? An adjective? (Take a moment and sit with these questions.) In 2002, I received a book as a Christmas gift from some friends at school. That book was Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy. I can only imagine the horror my parents must have felt. What kind of friends did I have that would buy this? (They knew exactly what kind of friends- white friends.) At 17, I didn’t have the understanding …

Making Lemonade at Home (Music Review)

She must see me as a live oak or a maple tree, sturdy enough to climb all the way to the top. Strong enough to carry her weight, and possibly the weight of all others. Never a hesitation of whether I will catch her as she jumps into my arms. And when I show weakness, physical limitations, she is puzzled. “What’s wrong mommy? Are you ok,” she’ll ask. “Yes, I just need to rest lovie…”

She’s Just Not That Into You (Book Review)

Back in 2006, I read a book called He’s Just Not That Into You, and it sort of changed my life. I came to terms with what was missing in my relationships, I started picking up on signs of disinterest from men, and I found a partner who loved me. We got married in 2009, and have been happy ever since. This is not a review on that book. This is a review on a book of similar title and nature (I’m assuming a play on the 2006 book). She’s Just Not That Into You is Aryka Randall’s first book. She created The Fab Femme Mag in 2010, an online magazine celebrating “feminine lesbian women.” From there, she added youtube content and web-series to her repertoire. I had never heard of Ms. Randall before, but after reading her book, I feel like she is a trusted friend. She wrote as if she was talking directly to me! (Well, to a younger me). Actually, Randall wrote this book with black, queer women in mind. I do not identify as …